Posted by: inshin | October 25, 2010

Sinead Ailill McDermott

My next interview is with Sinead Ailill McDermott.

She has had an interest in holistic healing & natural therapiessince she was a child.

She has been a Usui Reiki Master and healer since 1999 and has also trained as an Angel Guidance Practitioner. Together with her Mother Pauline, Sinead set up SpiritWise Holistic Healing Centre in County Mayo.

The Person

When or at what age did you first feel that you wanted to become involved in the whole area of Holistic Healing?

I became aware of the idea of healing and energies from about the age of 9. However this was not completely new to me. Since I was a toddler I could see people’s auras (the energy around their body) and I could see angels. When I began learning about these things from the age of 9 I felt I was just being reminded of something I already knew. I didn’t tell very many people about this as I wanted to fit in when I was younger. I had been bullied as a child for being different so it took me a long time to feel comfortable telling people. I began doing Reiki healing on a professional level about 2 years ago. Before this I had worked as a tutor in adult education. I wanted to finish my masters in adult education first before I began working full time in holistic healing. Attending college in Maynooth and gaining experience in the field of adult education gave me the courage and the confidence I needed to follow my dreams.

Is there any history of interest in this area from within your family?

My mum, Pauline, has read and studied a lot about healing and about spirituality. She was fascinated by energy healing and I guess she wanted to know more about this area as a result of having a child who talked about seeing angels and feeling energies. I’ve learned so much from my mum. She and my dad have been my greatest teachers in life. My family have always supported me in living my dream ;-).

When you start your day, is there any particular approach you take in preparing for what’s ahead?

When I wake up I think of at least 5 things that I am grateful for. I like to have an ‘attitude of gratitude’. People tend to think of all the things they don’t have and wake up and think ‘oh no it’s miserable outside or it’s a horrible day’. I try to focus on all the things I do have and the good things in my life. Having a positive mentality in the morning sets the tone for the rest of the day. I also use positive affirmations every day. After I was bullied as a child I experienced very serious bouts of depression for years. My self-esteem was very low at these times. I have found that a combination of all these techniques, and using holistic healing, has helped me to overcome the depression and get to a stage where I’m truly happy and comfortable with who I am.

How would you feel if someone told you that you need never practise Holistic Healing again for the rest of your life and all your material needs would be covered?

It’d be great to have all my material needs covered but I’d have to say there’s no way I could stop doing what I do! This isn’t just a job, it’s who I am. Being true to who I am is so important to me. I get such joy from working with my clients. I love interacting with people and I love it even more when I see a spark in their eye that wasn’t there before. I feel blessed to do what I do.

The Work

You meet many different types of people with different issues, how do you prepare yourself before the session?

Before a session I usually do a grounding meditation so that I am in the right frame of mind for the person coming for healing. I prepare the room and do a space clearing using incense, sage and bells to clear away any stuck or negative energies.

Is it easy to become affected by the client’s issues while trying to help?

People come for healing for many different reasons and some can have some very serious issues. I keep a professional relationship with all my clients and I make sure not to take on their issues personally. You could easily become affected by a client’s issues but it’s so important to protect yourself from doing so. In some cases I may feel I need to refer my clients to other areas of therapy such as counselling, homeopathy or to their GP. I have a circle of other therapists that I can refer people on to if they need it. It is important for me to maintain a professional relationship at all times.

Many people require Holistic Healing services outside their working day, or curious friends may take opportunities to learn more, how do you manage the balance between business and personal worlds?

I do offer treatments to people a number of evenings a week and I work some weekends but not every weekend. If I work an evening then I will take the morning or afternoon off. Many of my friends are either massage therapists or do card readings so we barter treatments. It’s very handy. I make sure to take time out to enjoy my hobbies and interests such as cycling, hill-walking or going to rugby matches ;-).

How do you approach your own work when it comes to reviewing it after a client session?

Well I keep notes on all sessions so I can review what’s coming up for clients over a period of time. Keeping notes also helps me to debrief after a session.

The Clients

What sort of people do you see?

I work with people from all walks of life. I’ve worked with people in their 80s right down to babies just a few months old. I have clients who come with physical, mental, emotional and spiritual issues. I’ve done sessions with pregnant women; young children; elderly people; and even on animals!

What methods of connecting with clients do you use, which do you find effective and why?

In terms of getting my name out there, I find the internet very useful. I blog on my website at www.spiritwise.ie. Social networking is also great to interact with people – I use Twitter (I’m @sineadailill and @Spirit_Wise ) and Facebook (at facebook.com/SpiritWiseHealing ). But there’s nothing to beat some face to face interaction though – especially in the work that I do.

Is it important to you how clients react to your work?

Yes I’d like to know if what I’m doing is helping people. I have a good relationship with my clients and usually get feedback from everyone that comes to me. It’s usually really good feedback too, which is great! I feel great when I know that the treatment has helped or if somebody has felt the benefits of attending one of our workshops.

Have you received negative criticism and if so how have you managed that?

No I’ve never received any negative criticism personally for the work that I do. People are curious about what I do, some may be sceptical and I completely understand that. I can’t explain how all these things work. I just say give it a try and if it works for you, great. People who come to me generally have some knowledge of what is involved before they come, so there are no surprises.  In discussions I often hear negative criticism about holistic healing or alternative therapies, but their criticisms are often based on lack of awareness, information or understanding.  I don’t try to convince anyone, people have choices.

The Business

While we see Holistic Healing as perhaps vocational in the medical area, it is also very much a business, what has been your approach to starting and establishing the business?

I began doing Reiki when I was 15 years old but it wasn’t until the last year or so that I began doing it professionally. I’m lucky that my family has had a lot of experience in business so they’ve given me a lot of advice and support in getting it going as a business.

Do you feel that there are support mechanisms in place for new or developing businesses?

Yes. I’ve been along to Open Coffee meetings here in Mayo and they are a great way of finding out information and getting to know other local business people.

What is your opinion of the impact of the internet on your business?

The internet has been great for the business. I use social networking sites to advertise and interact with people. I’ve had a lot of business coming through from our own website and from an online holistic directory. I think at least 60% of my clients have come through the internet.

We’re More than half way through 2010, and a difficult period in business, do you feel that there are signs of things improving and what can we do to encourage more confidence?

For me it’s all about positive thinking. I am a great believer in the law of attraction and having a positive mental attitude. People are beginning to appreciate the more important things in life. I think the future is bright.

Finally, the Healing, many people probably don’t understand what Holistic Healing is, if asked, what brief summary would you give to help them understand more.

I usually refer people to my website for specific information on holistic healing.  Here are some short extracts from my blogs:

Holistic healing (also referred to as alternative or complementary therapy / medicine), is an umbrella term used to encompass many different approaches to health and wellbeing.

For example:

  • energy healing (reiki, pranic healing, bioenergy);
  • therapeutic skills (massage, reflexology, aromatherapy;
  • self-help skills (relaxation techniques, meditation, visualisation) and
  • diagnostic practices (muscle testing/kinesiology, iridology, Kirlian photography) and many more.

What they all have in common is the idea that you have to take account of the whole person, mind, body and spirit; that you cannot approach a person as if he or she is a machine.  People are complex and holistic healing practices and techniques try to address the underlying problem at an energetic, emotional or spiritual level.   Energy healing rebalances the life force energy within and around the human body.  If the energy system becomes imbalanced or disturbed in any way it automatically affects the physical, mental, spiritual and emotional aspects of a person.

——–  End  ——–

Thanks to Sinead for agreeing to take the interview, remember to check out her site. You can also follow Sinead on Twitter and Spiritwise on Twitter

Excluding introduction and images, ©Denis Vaughan.

Posted by: inshin | September 13, 2010

Frederique Murphy

Born in France, I moved to Ireland after my leaving cert in search of my ancestors (that is of course where the“Murphy” comes from!) and felt immediately at home: a French woman with an Irish heart! I live in Dublin with my Dutch husband. “Mountain Moving Mindset” blog is focused on introducing you to a set of tips, strategies and techniques that I call the M3 power.

The Person

When or at what age did you first feel that you wanted to run your own business?

I must have been 11 or 12 😉 I was working on a school assignment, where I had to interview a person I admire; I picked my grand-father and I remember being in complete AWE hearing him telling me about all of his business adventures, a real entrepreneur! From that moment on, the entrepreneurial spark was in me and it was only a matter of time for me to make it happen!

Is there any history of entrepreneurship in your family?

😉 I guess I have just answered that question!

What sort of periodicals or newspapers do you like to read?

I’ll admit, not many; I mostly get my news from online, Twitter is amazing for that and then when I want to check a news further, I read the online version of the Irish Times.

How would you feel if someone told you that you need never work again for the rest of your life and all your material needs would be covered?

Ahhhh! You cannot take away my passion; my work is my passion and in the words of Confucius , since I have chosen a job I love, I will never have to work a day in my life; which is truly how I feel.

The Work

When or how do you get your ideas for the business?

Usually, when I least expect them; very, very rarely, at my desk. I have probably gotten over 75% of my business ideas while chilling out with friends and family. The proof of that is in the amount of ideas written in my idea book, which I carry everywhere, and on the amount of napkins, I’ve written on 😉

Do you have a set routine that you follow on a daily basis, or do you have a different approach?

Half/Half; as my business has evolved and is growing, I have started implementing more systems and processes, which makes a lot of the activities smoother, so, all of these are set routines. Having said that, outside of these systems, which probably take about 30% of my day, the rest is always different, I am a very flexible approach.

How do you manage the balance between business and personal worlds?

My number #1 strategy for balance is my planning; I plan everything and for instance, plan and put placeholders in my calendar for both business and personal activities; that way, all activities are booked and planned for.

How do you approach your own work when it comes to reviewing it?

I am a perfectionist (!) and thrive on always improving and always reaching that next level, so monitoring, reviewing, adjusting are part of my routines.

The Clients

What type of businesses do you try to connect with?

My niche is mindset (I know, a large niche!) so my services and solutions apply to all businesses. And, within those businesses, I connect with the owners directly, because helping them master their mindset will have the biggest impact on them mastering their business.

What methods of connecting with clients do you use, which do you find effective and why?

I use a lot of the online social media platform to first connect, give, interact, give, engage, and give again; and with my clients, I connect on the phone, face-to-face, by mail, really leveraging all appropriate media.

Is it important to you how clients react to your work?

Absolutely, I commit to excellence and I am very dedicated to my clients and their successes and will thrive to not only meet but exceed my client expectations.

Have you received negative criticism and if so how have you managed that?

Not so much with my clients, but people around me.  When that happens, I put myself in their shoes and see the world through their eyes, so that I can understand their point of view; that way, I am in a better place to see what I can do. I work with people’s stuff (yes, that a word!) and there is a common tendency to attack/critic the person who is pushing your buttons (that would be me!); I feel it is part of it and will always happen, as it is not necessarily depending on me (well, I ensure that it does not!) Also, I have noticed, as my visibility has increased and as I am on stage as a speaker, I have found that people will have mix reactions, and either love you or hate you. I don’t find this easy, but I am learning how to deal with it!

The Business

There are so many small and medium size businesses in Ireland, and more again starting, what has been your approach to starting and establishing the business?

The first call I made was to my accountant! I had identified that legal structure (which my amazing accountant also advised me on) and numbers were my immediate weaknesses, so bringing an expert on board was the thing to do. Once set up as a company, I defined my expertise by answering 4 questions: Niche, the “What”, Market, the “Who”, Problems, the “Why” and Solutions, the “How”. Then, with these answers, I worked on a communication and marketing plan and off I went!

Do you feel that there are support mechanisms in place for new or developing businesses?

Yes, there are so many! As long as you ask for help.

What is your opinion of the impact of the internet on business?

I love it; I come from a communication background and the internet has multiplied the communication channels we used to have, it is fascinating and providing an ever-growing pool of opportunities.

We’re half way through 2010, and a difficult period in business, do you feel that there are signs of things improving and what can we do to encourage more confidence ?

So, I hear when I watch the news; in my opinion and in my experience, between my clients successes and mine, it has not been a difficult period; it has been a period, where creativity, imagination, persistence, resilience to name a few have been needed. You see, our thoughts control our actions and our actions determine our results, so it is really up to us to take control of our mind to get the results we want. By realising that, it empowers all of us to take charge of our life and business and make it happen.

——–  End  ——–

Thanks to Frederique for agreeing to take the interview, remember to check out her site. You can also follow Frederique on Twitter

Excluding introduction and images, ©Denis Vaughan.

Posted by: inshin | August 24, 2010

David O’Brien

My next interview is with the Artist,  David O’Brien (the painter Flynn).

Every picture has a story…

As a painter I have succeeded to a certain degree if I can cause the viewer armed with just a visual image and a title a moments pause or reflection or question. I succeed again to a certain degree if I am happy for you the viewer to see the image.

I am my own sternest critic and just how the image is presented has to be satisfactory to my ego. No one likes being judged. On a daily basis I improve in a technical sense; the rest my dear friend is marketing, that is, if ones obsession is to prosper in ones own lifetime.

I have a cunning plan. As it is most of my pictures sell on the easel. I frame my pictures once I am satisfied that I will complete the picture. This in turn confuses callers to my studio to believe they are for sale. That of course is not the cunning plan.

The Person

When or at what age did you first create images that felt like art?

The educational system records that I passed if not (the memory)got an Honor in Art in the Leaving  Cert.which involved drawing a HB milk bottle, I had only attended art classes once as the class was held in the library and involved passing a pub to get to it. My first picture didn’t arrive until I was 41 at which time I had become friendly with Phillip Hope, a Canadian painter and hoarder who got me going as it were, was my bro’s house from memory and my 2nd a bit more notable addressed the ‘Information Superhighway’, a distant mountain chain (remarkably like a woman reclining on her back in a certain light) in a dawn yellow sky with a centred highway in which I managed to fiddle a little bit with stretchy road signs to effect   $$  signs. A chap from Las Vegas bought it and put a facsimile on the front of a prospectus he was sending to the 100000 richest Americans. That was the key .

Was there any tradition of painting or other forms of art in your family?

Not really the family history was teaching, publicans and coopering on my dad’s side who was an Engineer, and medicine and milling on my mum’s side, she was a Pharmacist.

When you’re out and about, are there certain types of places or areas you feel drawn to?

Not really any more. Pubs up to my 1st stagger at 37.

How would you feel if someone told you that you need never paint again for the rest of your life and all your material needs would be covered?

That is pretty much the situation. In recent years I have been held back by ill health stemming from stress arising from a banking misadventure (High Court Nov 1st) so am improving daily.

The Craft

When or how do you get the inspiration to paint?

If I have a blank canvass in front of me I never seem to have trouble thinking about what to put down I rarely  maybe 2/3 times have put down the same image. Sometimes if I am really stuck I will put down a few grounds and see if they suggest anything to me .

When you paint, do you feel drawn to any particular types of images?

I suppose all artist ‘s would like to paint that one masterpiece which generally is a well captured moment in time that poses some mystery, I try to tell stories as much as possible and leave a little mystery?

How often do you feel you should paint, everyday or just when you feel that desire ?

When I am in the studio its full-time day and night I am easily obsessed and happiest when I have 25 /30 on the go.

How do you approach your own painting when it comes to reviewing it?

I think I would be fairly hard on myself and hard to satisfy but lucky in that I seem to know early on whether an image is worth pursuing.

The Audience

Who do you paint for?

Myself, the rest has been luck.

Do you try to connect with your audience and if so how?

I am always surprised at the people who buy my pictures or more so the pictures they buy.

Is it important to you how people react to your painting?

Haven’t really had any harsh criticism other than myself.

Have you received negative criticism and if so how have you managed that?

Worst I have had is from the head of Fine art at NCAD who says he can turn me into a great painter if I just attend one semester, he points out that I could use dark pigment to greater advantage and he is right .

The Business

Do you see this as a business?

I am sure it could be and is to the dealers and galleries but not to me in that sense. Some contemporary Artist’s are Empires.

History would suggest that the art of painting is a difficult life to create a reasonable full-time living from, do you think that  has stayed the same or have things changed that allow artists continue to focus purely on their work to survive?

Historically it was probably easier, in theory it should be easier today as there are a lot more walls, I think today people want more something that they can live with.

Do you feel that there are support mechanisms in place for a new painter?

If you have some talent and work at it you will make your own mechanisms.The Arts Council is a reasonably run organisation from what I can see of it.

How do you feel the Internet has impacted on the artistic world of painting?

It’s only fantastic if one puts the work in not only building a site but linking it up is the biz. The opportunity is extraordinary. The one problem with the net is that all you have is a photograph to judge and no matter how good it is it doesn’t have the same impact apart from colour coordination in some cases.

——–  End  ——–

More of his work

Thanks to David for agreeing to take the interview, remember to check out his site. You can also follow David on Twitter

Excluding introduction and images, ©Denis Vaughan.

Posted by: inshin | August 9, 2010

Shane Murphy

An avid photographer that never spends enough time behind the lens. I love taking photos of people,places & things. I really enjoy the organised photowalks all around Ireland. I’m a member of the top photographic club in the country, the Drogheda Photographic Club. I won the 2009 Guinness Storehouse photograph of the year.

The Person

When or at what age did you first pick up a camera take a photograph and think, this is good?

I’ve always had an interest in taking photographs, from the earlier cheap 35mm cameras, to my 1st SLR. Was thrilled when spending some of my early wages on film processing & getting 2 or 3 ‘keepers’ per roll. My interest in taking photos increased dramatically when it became digital.

Was there any tradition or influences within your family towards photography?

None of my immediate family had an interest in photography. However several uncles were keen at shooting video or ‘cine camera’ as I think it was called in the late 60’s or early 70’s.

When you’re out and about do you have a camera with you normally, and are there cerain types of places or areas you feel drawn to for taking photographs?

I try to have my camera with me most times. I tend not to bring the DSLRs with me, but have a lovely Canon G9, which fits neatly into the car. Have got some lovely shots from this camera.  As for the type of photo or location, I don’t tie myself to any area too much. I love portrait, landscape, night time, natural light & flash photography and try to do a bit of them all. For my photoblog, I tend to publish mainly landscapes, seascapes, IR [infra red] or macro shots as I generally don’t post shots of people on the web, unless I ask permission beforehand.

How would you feel if someone told you that you need never photograph again for the rest of your life and all your material needs would be covered?

To be honest, I don’t take photographs for a living as I have a ‘real job’ that pays mortgage etc. I love taking photos that make me happy & others smile when they see them. To loose that joy would make me very sad.

The Craft

When, how or what gives you inspiration to take a picture?

I get inspiration from many areas.  It could be a flower lit by the setting sunlight, the smile of a beautiful woman, the reflection of a face in a mirror. I could be browsing the web or reading a magazine & get a great idea for a portrait setup. Sometimes, while at the local camera club, I get ideas from images shown by people who are visiting the club.

When you take a picture, do you feel drawn to any particular types of images?

Not really. As mentioned before, I love many types of photography. Probably, my favourite would be portrait photography. I’m loving taking shot of a person & lighting them the way I want with the few speedlights I own. You can get great effects by changing the light settings on your lights or camera. I also am loving taking landscapes & seascapes recently. I’ve been using different lenses to get different effects & love experimenting by combining lenses with different techniques to see the different results.

How often do you feel you should take photographs, everyday or just when you feel that desire?

I’d love to take photos every day. I can go a whole week taking shots every day. Then I could leave it for up to a week without pressing the shutter release. It’s like playing any sport, the more you practice, the better you will get at the game.

How do you approach your own photographs when it comes to reviewing it?

I think like most photographers, we are our own worst critics. I tend to take many shots & delete a few in the camera that are definite no-nos. I then upload to my Mac & select the keepers. Because hard drives are so inexpensive, I tend to store most shots, just in case I feel the need to go back to them some day.

The Audience

Who do you take photographs for?

If I got my way, I’d take photographs just for me. Saying that I do like making people smile after seeing one of my shots. I take quite a few shots of the kids, though they tend to avoid me with the camera at this stage.

Do you try to connect with your audience and if so how?

I suppose I connect with my ‘so called’ audience by having my website, my photoblog & my pix.ie web pages. For me, I try to put 2-3 new images up on my photoblog every week and put a few up on pix.ie every now & again. I love getting comments on the photoblog & on pix.ie. It spurs me on to take more shots to put up onlne.

Is it important to you how people react to your photographs?

I’d like to think people react positively to my photographs. You can never please all of the people all of the time. Generally comments are only given if they are positive. It’s rare that someone posts negative comments. I like positive comments, but constructive criticism can be a great help. It can point me in a direction I might not have seen.

Have you received negative criticism and if so how have you managed that?

As I said before, you can’t please everyone all of the time. I have had one or two negative comments on flickr, but that was a long time ago & there are some really rude people on that site.

The Business

Do you see this as a business?

I would love to see this as a business. At the moment it’s more of a hobby. It’s also nice to know I have something to fall back on should anything ever happen with my ‘real job’.

The ability to take quality photographs and certainly produce them used to be very much a specialised activity. With the advent of Digital equipment and production methods, has that impacted possitively or negatively, or both?

For me, I really bit the photography bug when the move was towards digital. Most of what I know as regards to production methods was discovered in the digital age. The likes of Photoshop, Lightroom & Photomatix Pro [for HDR photography only] are purely for the digital side of photography. There are a few purists out there who still swear by fixing chemicals, enlargers & Ilford film, but I’m not one of them. Yes it does make producing an image a bit easier than the film days, but I think it’s a positive step.

Do you feel that there are support mechanisms in place for a person interested in working more in the area of photography?

There are several support mechanisms out there for people interested in photography. My 1st recommendation would be to join your nearest camera / photographic club. The Drogheda club has been of great help to me over the years. There are many online forums that you can join to get useful tips & hints. I’d recommend places such as the photography forum on boards.ie, the Irish photo sharing website http://pix.ie, the brilliant meeting point for people who like taking photos, http://photowalk.ie and all the lovely guys & gals that are as much into photography on twitter. I really can’t recommend the connections & friends you can make on twitter highly enough.

How do you feel the Internet has impacted on the world of photography?

Simple answer here, 100% yes. Need I say anymore. Just have a look at all the sites & forums I mentioned in the last question. Without the net, there’d be no photoblogs, no photo sharing websites like pix.ie or flickr. Photography would be a totally different pastime in my opinion. It’s because of the net that we are able to share our latest shots to our family, friends & peers.

——–  End  ——–

Thanks to Shane for agreeing to take the interview, remember to check out his site. Other sites you can find Shane on – Flash Murphy and pix.ie You can also follow Shane on Twitter

Some of Shane’s work:

.

Excluding introduction and images, ©Denis Vaughan.

Posted by: inshin | July 21, 2010

Grainne Sherlock

Grainne has 18 years experience in hospitality, management & supervisory positions. Her goal has been to make a career out of promoting all tourism related businesses in Ireland. She started Emerald Discounts a promotional company for tourism products in Ireland in 2007 and then set-up Local Discounts to include all businesses in Ireland in May 2009 .

The Person

When or at what age did you first feel that you wanted to run your own business?

I think once I turned about 30 I started thinking of it.

Is there any history of entrepreneurship in your family?

No none at all , not sure where it came from, think it was a passion to please people in a way that suited me not an employer and the freedom to choose

What sort of periodicals or newspapers do you like to read?

The examiner, and some of the tabloids .

How would you feel if someone told you that you need never work again for the rest of your life and all your material needs would be covered?

Not sure, I do most of my work for passion and pleasure so its not really work so this would probably continue. I love Tourism and think I would end up giving my time for free to please a tourist .

The Work

When or how do you get your ideas for the business?

I lie in bed a night like other people and dream up ways of doing business and creating better experiences for people. I am also inspired by others and their ideas and love talking about ideas to other business people, it helps to be creative.

Do you have a set routine that you follow on a daily basis, or do you have a different approach?

LOL I am a total non believer in the 9 to 5 concept so this gives me the flexibility to work outside this. This also means I may not start until 10 am or I may end up doing some work at 11pm but when you love what you do its not a problem

How do you manage the balance between business and personal worlds?

I work from home at the moment so you have to learn to be inventive and have been known to take calls sitting in the car in my driveway, given the way I work the too blend together nicely, and working from home means I am there for my family.

How do you approach your own work when it comes to reviewing it?

I am very critical of my own work and I am always looking for ways to bring a better service to my customers.

The Clients

What type of businesses do you try to connect with?

Anyone really as you never know where your next sale will come from and I try not to categorise people. I have seen this mistake being made by others .

What methods of connecting with clients do you use, which do you find effective and why?

I find informal chats on the phone lead to sales, I also think Facebook has huge potential and I have gained alot of customers through it , twitter is great for leads but I don’t think its a suitable place to sell, and should only be used as a means of communicating with your customers.

Is it important to you how clients react to your work?

It is one of my downfalls. I love what I do and feel that if a client doesnt love it too then I have not explained it properly to them.

Have you received negative criticism and if so how have you managed that?

I am getting better but I really take negative critisism to heart and blame myself for not seeing whatever the person comes back with.

The Business

There are so many small and medium size businesses in Ireland, and more again starting, what has been your approach to starting and establishing the business?

Firstly I would advise networking and building up a large volume of contacts, I have done this and find it invaluable. I always have someone in my contacts whom would help or give advice to me when needed.

Do you feel that there are support mechanisms in place for new or developing businesses?

There is lots of help out there the problem is knowing where to look and how to tap into to those mediums .

What is your opinion of the impact of the internet on business?

I feel that you can take a home based business and develop it into a worldwide business, the internet is an important part of reaching your target audience and is becoming more important everyday and everyone should be as up to date as possible on currents trends and developments.

We’re half way through 2010, and a difficult period in business, do you feel that there are signs of things improving and what can we do to encourage more confidence .

I honestly think that most people are optimistic about the economy and are striving to change and adapt to their current situations , its about attitude as much as it is about surviving.

——–  End  ——–

Thanks to Grainne for agreeing to take this interview. You can follow Grainne on Twitter and don’t forget to visit Local Discounts.

Excluding introduction, ©Denis Vaughan.

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